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CellMed 2023; 13(7): 5.1-5.3

Published online May 31, 2023

https://doi.org/10.5667/CellMed.spc.026

© Cellmed Orthocellular Medicine and Pharmaceutical Association

Case Study of a Wart Patient Using Ortho-cellular Nutritional Therapy (OCNT)

Pharmacist Shimi Min

Cellmed Pharmacy, Light of Therapy, 494 Achasan-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul

Correspondence to : *Shimi Min
E-mail: simimin@hanmail.net

Received: May 31, 2023; Accepted: May 31, 2023

Objective: A case report of wart patient treated with Ortho-cellular Nutritional Therapy.
Methods: A 95-year-old Korean male with a large wart measuring more than 1cm in diameter, experiencing no pain but discomfort in daily life.
Results: After 50 days of applying nutritional therapy, the wart completely disappeared.
Conclusion: The application of nutritional therapy can soften the hardened tissue of warts and aid in the treatment process.

Keywords Ortho-Cellular Nutrition Therapy (OCNT), warts, human papillomavirus

Warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a DNA tumor virus that induces epithelial proliferation on the skin and mucous membrane surfaces. Excessive proliferation of the epidermis manifests as cauliflower-like growths (less than 1cm in size) and can have negative aesthetic effects. HPV comprises over 100 different types of viruses, including approximately 30-40 variants that infect the human genitalia.1 Furthermore, the main concern regarding HPV is its role in causing cervical cancer, which is the most common cancer among women. The annual incidence of cervical cancer is nearly half a million cases, and the mortality rate is approximately 50%. The occurrence of warts is not age-dependent but is most common in children and less frequent in older adults.2 The occurrence of warts is not age-dependent but is most common in children and less frequent in older adults. Warts are contagious and can spread from one part of the body to another, as well as from one person to another. Most warts do not cause pain, but some warts can be painful when touched.

Treatment options for warts include surgical excision, cryotherapy (freezing), and localized removal methods such as laser therapy. However, these methods can potentially cause scarring and carry a risk of recurrence.3 In addition, chemical therapies using salicylic acid and lactic acid are available, but their effectiveness and side effects can vary from person to person. Treatment with antimitotic agents such as 5-fluorouracil has also been attempted, but it is associated with certain side effects.4

The patient in this case is an elderly individual who had a significantly enlarged wart without experiencing pain or itching. However, they were experiencing discomfort due to the wart when wearing glasses. Therefore, nutritional therapy was applied, and I would like to report on the progress of the treatment.

1. Subject

A case study of a patient with warts was conducted.

1) Name: Kang O O (M/95 years old)

2) Diagnosis: Warts

3) Onset date: 2022

4) Treatment period: March 4, 2023 - April 29, 2023 (approximately 50 days)

5) Symptoms: No pain or itching. Discomfort when wearing glasses due to contact with the affected area.

6) Past medical history: None

7) Social history: None

8) Family history: None

9) Current medications: None

2. Method

Sulfoplex Cream Mild (111, three times a day, once daily)

Cyaplex Night Cream (111, three times a day, once daily)

They were applied alternately, covering the wart with a sufficient amount of cream.

The patient in this case had a large wart measuring approximately 1cm in diameter and 1cm in height located on the eyelid. While methods such as keratolytic agents, salicylic acid, or a mixture of salicylic acid and 5`-fluorouracil can be convenient, they can also be time-consuming, and considering the proximity of the lesion to the eye, there was a concern about potential eye irritation, so these options were excluded. Cryotherapy was also not preferred as it would require multiple visits to the hospital, which might be difficult for an elderly patient. Initially, a small amount of Sulfoplex cream and Cyaplex night cream were applied using a cotton swab. However, since there was no improvement, after applying it sufficiently to ensure adequate absorption, it was gently rubbed on the affected area. As a result, the wart completely disappeared after about 50 days (Figure 1).

Fig. 1. Changes in Warts Over Time After the Application of OCNT. A: Before Implementing Nutritional Therapy. B: After Implementing Nutritional Therapy

The HPV that causes warts exists in various types according to their unique genetic sequences. The appearance of the lesions is influenced not only by the virus type but also by environmental and host factors. There have been reports of warts transforming into cancer cells in a small number of individuals with significantly compromised immune function. Half of kidney transplant recipients develop warts within five years.1 Furthermore, when the lesions are exposed to sunlight, the frequency of wart occurrence increases, and there is a potential risk of developing cancer. Currently, there is no single effective treatment method, and the only approach is to combine various types of treatments for management. Combination therapy carries a risk of recurrence. If natural healing is possible, no specific intervention may be necessary, although it may have cosmetic implications. It has been reported that patients with long-standing warts that do not improve over time and those with compromised immune function have a lower likelihood of spontaneous healing and may face greater challenges in treatment.5 The ideal goal of wart treatment is to achieve non-recurrence, avoid scarring, and induce lifelong immunity. In the case of the patient, the wart lesions were extensive, and there was a potential risk of malignant transformation due to compromised immune function. It has been reported that Hyaluronic Acid, which is present in Sulfoplex Cream Mild and Cyaplex Balm, along with EGCG, Folic Acid, and Vitamin B12, has shown a high cure rate in wart treatment for patients infected with HPV.6 Furthermore, tocopherol, when taken together with vitamin A, has been reported to be effective7 in the treatment of warts. It has been reported that individuals with low tocopherol levels are more susceptible to HPV infection.8 There is active research being conducted on the potential therapeutic effects of natural substances with anti-viral properties, such as lavender oil, in the treatment of warts. These natural substances hold promise as potential treatment options for warts, and ongoing studies are investigating their effectiveness.9

The present case is a single case study, and its applicability to the general population may be limited, with certain interpretational constraints. However, considering the patient's circumstances, the applied nutritional therapy has the potential to contribute to the complete resolution of warts within a short period of time. Therefore, with the patient's consent, this report aims to share the findings.

  1. Braaten, K. P. & Laufer, M. R. Human Papillomavirus (HPV), HPV-Related Disease, and the HPV Vaccine. Rev Obstet Gynecol 1, 2-10 (2008).
  2. Molijn, A., Kleter, B., Quint, W. & van Doorn, L. J. Molecular diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. J Clin Virol 32 Suppl 1, S43-51, doi:10.1016/j.jcv.2004.12.004 (2005).
    Pubmed CrossRef
  3. Vance, J. C. et al. Intralesional recombinant alpha-2 interferon for the treatment of patients with condyloma acuminatum or verruca plantaris. Arch Dermatol 122, 272-277 (1986).
    Pubmed CrossRef
  4. Hursthouse, M. W. A controlled trial on the use of topical 5-fluorouracil on viral warts. Br J Dermatol 92, 93-96, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2133.1975.tb03039.x (1975).
    Pubmed CrossRef
  5. Sterling, J., Handfield‐Jones, S. & Hudson, P. J. B. J. o. D. Guidelines for the management of cutaneous warts. 144, 4-11 (2001).
    Pubmed CrossRef
  6. Aragona, C., Bezerra Espinola, M. S., Bilotta, G., Porcaro, G. & Calcagno, M. J. J. o. C. M. Evaluating the Efficacy of Pervistop®, a New Combination Based on EGCG, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 and Hyaluronic Acid on Patients with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Persistent Infections and Cervical Lesions: A Pilot Study. 12, 2171 (2023).
    Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
  7. Steinberg, M. D. A new treatment for resistant warts; report of 300 cases. Surgery 39, 642-644 (1956).
    CrossRef
  8. Giuliano, A. R. et al. Antioxidant nutrients: associations with persistent human papillomavirus infection. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 6, 917-923 (1997).
  9. Forbes, M. A. & Schmid, M. M. Use of OTC essential oils to clear plantar warts. Nurse Pract 31, 53-55, 57, doi:10.1097/00006205-200603000-00019 (2006).
    Pubmed CrossRef

Article

Case Report

CellMed 2023; 13(7): 5.1-5.3

Published online May 31, 2023 https://doi.org/10.5667/CellMed.spc.026

Copyright © Cellmed Orthocellular Medicine and Pharmaceutical Association.

Case Study of a Wart Patient Using Ortho-cellular Nutritional Therapy (OCNT)

Pharmacist Shimi Min

Cellmed Pharmacy, Light of Therapy, 494 Achasan-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul

Correspondence to:*Shimi Min
E-mail: simimin@hanmail.net

Received: May 31, 2023; Accepted: May 31, 2023

Abstract

Objective: A case report of wart patient treated with Ortho-cellular Nutritional Therapy.
Methods: A 95-year-old Korean male with a large wart measuring more than 1cm in diameter, experiencing no pain but discomfort in daily life.
Results: After 50 days of applying nutritional therapy, the wart completely disappeared.
Conclusion: The application of nutritional therapy can soften the hardened tissue of warts and aid in the treatment process.

Keywords: Ortho-Cellular Nutrition Therapy (OCNT), warts, human papillomavirus

Introduction

Warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a DNA tumor virus that induces epithelial proliferation on the skin and mucous membrane surfaces. Excessive proliferation of the epidermis manifests as cauliflower-like growths (less than 1cm in size) and can have negative aesthetic effects. HPV comprises over 100 different types of viruses, including approximately 30-40 variants that infect the human genitalia.1 Furthermore, the main concern regarding HPV is its role in causing cervical cancer, which is the most common cancer among women. The annual incidence of cervical cancer is nearly half a million cases, and the mortality rate is approximately 50%. The occurrence of warts is not age-dependent but is most common in children and less frequent in older adults.2 The occurrence of warts is not age-dependent but is most common in children and less frequent in older adults. Warts are contagious and can spread from one part of the body to another, as well as from one person to another. Most warts do not cause pain, but some warts can be painful when touched.

Treatment options for warts include surgical excision, cryotherapy (freezing), and localized removal methods such as laser therapy. However, these methods can potentially cause scarring and carry a risk of recurrence.3 In addition, chemical therapies using salicylic acid and lactic acid are available, but their effectiveness and side effects can vary from person to person. Treatment with antimitotic agents such as 5-fluorouracil has also been attempted, but it is associated with certain side effects.4

The patient in this case is an elderly individual who had a significantly enlarged wart without experiencing pain or itching. However, they were experiencing discomfort due to the wart when wearing glasses. Therefore, nutritional therapy was applied, and I would like to report on the progress of the treatment.

Case Study

1. Subject

A case study of a patient with warts was conducted.

1) Name: Kang O O (M/95 years old)

2) Diagnosis: Warts

3) Onset date: 2022

4) Treatment period: March 4, 2023 - April 29, 2023 (approximately 50 days)

5) Symptoms: No pain or itching. Discomfort when wearing glasses due to contact with the affected area.

6) Past medical history: None

7) Social history: None

8) Family history: None

9) Current medications: None

2. Method

Sulfoplex Cream Mild (111, three times a day, once daily)

Cyaplex Night Cream (111, three times a day, once daily)

They were applied alternately, covering the wart with a sufficient amount of cream.

Results

The patient in this case had a large wart measuring approximately 1cm in diameter and 1cm in height located on the eyelid. While methods such as keratolytic agents, salicylic acid, or a mixture of salicylic acid and 5`-fluorouracil can be convenient, they can also be time-consuming, and considering the proximity of the lesion to the eye, there was a concern about potential eye irritation, so these options were excluded. Cryotherapy was also not preferred as it would require multiple visits to the hospital, which might be difficult for an elderly patient. Initially, a small amount of Sulfoplex cream and Cyaplex night cream were applied using a cotton swab. However, since there was no improvement, after applying it sufficiently to ensure adequate absorption, it was gently rubbed on the affected area. As a result, the wart completely disappeared after about 50 days (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Changes in Warts Over Time After the Application of OCNT. A: Before Implementing Nutritional Therapy. B: After Implementing Nutritional Therapy

Discussion

The HPV that causes warts exists in various types according to their unique genetic sequences. The appearance of the lesions is influenced not only by the virus type but also by environmental and host factors. There have been reports of warts transforming into cancer cells in a small number of individuals with significantly compromised immune function. Half of kidney transplant recipients develop warts within five years.1 Furthermore, when the lesions are exposed to sunlight, the frequency of wart occurrence increases, and there is a potential risk of developing cancer. Currently, there is no single effective treatment method, and the only approach is to combine various types of treatments for management. Combination therapy carries a risk of recurrence. If natural healing is possible, no specific intervention may be necessary, although it may have cosmetic implications. It has been reported that patients with long-standing warts that do not improve over time and those with compromised immune function have a lower likelihood of spontaneous healing and may face greater challenges in treatment.5 The ideal goal of wart treatment is to achieve non-recurrence, avoid scarring, and induce lifelong immunity. In the case of the patient, the wart lesions were extensive, and there was a potential risk of malignant transformation due to compromised immune function. It has been reported that Hyaluronic Acid, which is present in Sulfoplex Cream Mild and Cyaplex Balm, along with EGCG, Folic Acid, and Vitamin B12, has shown a high cure rate in wart treatment for patients infected with HPV.6 Furthermore, tocopherol, when taken together with vitamin A, has been reported to be effective7 in the treatment of warts. It has been reported that individuals with low tocopherol levels are more susceptible to HPV infection.8 There is active research being conducted on the potential therapeutic effects of natural substances with anti-viral properties, such as lavender oil, in the treatment of warts. These natural substances hold promise as potential treatment options for warts, and ongoing studies are investigating their effectiveness.9

The present case is a single case study, and its applicability to the general population may be limited, with certain interpretational constraints. However, considering the patient's circumstances, the applied nutritional therapy has the potential to contribute to the complete resolution of warts within a short period of time. Therefore, with the patient's consent, this report aims to share the findings.

Fig 1.

Figure 1.Changes in Warts Over Time After the Application of OCNT. A: Before Implementing Nutritional Therapy. B: After Implementing Nutritional Therapy
CellMed 2023; 13: 5.1-5.3https://doi.org/10.5667/CellMed.spc.026

References

  1. Braaten, K. P. & Laufer, M. R. Human Papillomavirus (HPV), HPV-Related Disease, and the HPV Vaccine. Rev Obstet Gynecol 1, 2-10 (2008).
  2. Molijn, A., Kleter, B., Quint, W. & van Doorn, L. J. Molecular diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. J Clin Virol 32 Suppl 1, S43-51, doi:10.1016/j.jcv.2004.12.004 (2005).
    Pubmed CrossRef
  3. Vance, J. C. et al. Intralesional recombinant alpha-2 interferon for the treatment of patients with condyloma acuminatum or verruca plantaris. Arch Dermatol 122, 272-277 (1986).
    Pubmed CrossRef
  4. Hursthouse, M. W. A controlled trial on the use of topical 5-fluorouracil on viral warts. Br J Dermatol 92, 93-96, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2133.1975.tb03039.x (1975).
    Pubmed CrossRef
  5. Sterling, J., Handfield‐Jones, S. & Hudson, P. J. B. J. o. D. Guidelines for the management of cutaneous warts. 144, 4-11 (2001).
    Pubmed CrossRef
  6. Aragona, C., Bezerra Espinola, M. S., Bilotta, G., Porcaro, G. & Calcagno, M. J. J. o. C. M. Evaluating the Efficacy of Pervistop®, a New Combination Based on EGCG, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 and Hyaluronic Acid on Patients with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Persistent Infections and Cervical Lesions: A Pilot Study. 12, 2171 (2023).
    Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
  7. Steinberg, M. D. A new treatment for resistant warts; report of 300 cases. Surgery 39, 642-644 (1956).
    CrossRef
  8. Giuliano, A. R. et al. Antioxidant nutrients: associations with persistent human papillomavirus infection. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 6, 917-923 (1997).
  9. Forbes, M. A. & Schmid, M. M. Use of OTC essential oils to clear plantar warts. Nurse Pract 31, 53-55, 57, doi:10.1097/00006205-200603000-00019 (2006).
    Pubmed CrossRef
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Apr 30, 2024 Vol.14 No.5, pp. 1.1~5.4

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